talking about the x-brace

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"Lighter and more robust knee brace with 3D printing"

The Straits Times, page B1, and online, 15 Dec

"Resembling a sleek knee brace used by Batman in movie The Dark Knight Rises, a new aid called X-Brace offers a leg up to those who suffer from knee problems. The lighter and more robust knee brace, which is targeted at the elderly, was developed in a collaboration between a local engineering firm, knee surgeons and 3D printing specialists from NTU. Dr Ho Chaw Sing, co-founder and managing director of National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster (NAMIC), a platform led by NTU's innovation and enterprise company NTUitive, said 3D printing is extremely useful for the rapid creation of prototypes and lightweight intricate designs, making the technique helpful for this particular project. NTU Asst Prof Chan Wai Lee from the MAE, who is the principal investigator of this project, said 3D-modelling was heavily used to validate the various design ideas that led to the weight reduction in the brace. Mr Joel Lim, a PhD student in Prof Chan's team, led the design efforts in discussion with Delsson and 3D-printed the prototype for real-life validation tests."

"Lighter and more robust knee brace with 3D printing"

CNA, 15 Dec, 10pm

"A lighter, yet more robust knee brace has been developed for the elderly. It's 30% lighter to aid mobility and 80% cheaper. The engineers were from Delsson Singapore who worked with 3D printing specialists from NTU Singapore to develop the product and they were brought together by the NAMIC. It's an example of how local SMEs can tap on strong local research and development capabilities to transform conventional products and boost their competitiveness. Ho Chaw Sing, Managing Director of NAMIC said they have a curated network of investors to help start-ups and at the same time they work with agencies like EDB and Enterprise Singapore, so it’s a whole of government effort. Over the past 5 years, about 60 SMEs have worked with NAMIC on various projects."

"Locally developed 3D printed lightweight knee pads, elderly knee pain can be customised"

Channel 8, 15 Dec, 6.30pm

"Local researchers have used 3D printing technology to print custom-made lightweight knee braces for elderly people with knee problems. This lightweight knee brace was jointly developed by researchers from NTU and a local company, Delsson, supported by the NAMIC. Made from plastic, the new brace is 30% lighter than metal braces on the market and weighs only 720 grams, and can help the elderly climb stairs. Mdm Tan Lee Lee, said wearing the brace frees her from up using her walking stick, which she likes. "

"3D printing leads to lightweight knee brace for the elderly"

The Hill, USA, 15 Dec

"A Singapore-based engineering company with the help of specialists from NTU Singapore have created a new lightweight knee brace using 3D-printing technology.  According to the engineering company, Delsson, designers used lightweight plastic and assistive springs to help create the new brace, called X-Brace, which weighs roughly 30 percent less than a traditional metal knee brace. Delsson believes that X-Brace will revolutionize the way physicians and physiotherapists will treat different knee conditions.  “With a fast-aging global population, light-weight assistive orthotics enabled by 3D printing - such as personalized knee braces, will increasingly become an essential tool in geriatrics, to achieve better elderly patient care and outcomes,” said Ho Chaw Sing, co-founder and managing director of the NAMIC which supported the collaboration.  "

"A lighter but more robust knee brace for older people with knee problems was developed locally by the Singaporean engineering company Delsson, in collaboration with 3D printing specialists at NTU. Using 3D printing techniques - also known as additive manufacturing - the team succeeded in reducing the weight of a traditional exoskeleton knee brace (usually constructed of metal) by 30%, thanks to an innovative design that uses lightweight plastic and assistance springs. Based on the 3D printed prototype, Delsson and the Singapore Centre for Orthopaedics have developed a unique product, named X-Brace, which resembles the elegant knee brace used by Batman in the movie, The Dark Knight Rises. The research collaboration is supported by the NAMIC. "

-  Also reported in Australia on 24

A lighter, yet more robust knee brace for the elderly who suffer from knee problems has been developed locally by Singapore engineering firm Delsson, in a collaboration with 3D printing specialists from NTU Singapore. Using 3D printing techniques—also known as additive manufacturing—the team has managed to reduce the weight of a traditional exoskeleton knee brace, typically built using metal, by 30 percent, thanks to a new design that uses lightweight plastic and assistive springs. NTU Asst ProfChan Wai Lee, the principal investigator of this project from the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, said 3D-modeling was heavily used to validate the various design ideas that led to the weight reduction.

The sleek knee brace that Batman wore in The Dark Knight Rises is similar to a new brace called the X-Brace that offers a knee brace for those with knee problems. Aiming for the elderly, the lightest and strongest knee brace was developed in collaboration between a local engineering company and knee surgeons and 3D printing specialists from NTU. The team ultimately reduced the weight of the brace to around 720 grams, 30 percent lighter than a conventional exoskeleton knee brace. It is made of plastic, rather than the typical metal braces that weigh more than 1kg. 3D modeling was used extensively to validate various design ideas that reduced the weight of the strut, said NTU Asst Prof Chan Wai Lee from the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, who is the principal investigator on the project. Joel Lim, a PhD student on Professor Chan's team, led the design effort in a discussion with Delsson and printed a prototype for 3D validation tests.